A Tribute to
Ambassador Major General Quazi Golam Dastgir, KAAO, psc
Ambassador Major General Quazi Golam Dastgir, KAAO, psc is a leading South Asian diplomatic and military figure, with a career spanning five decades and expertise covering a wide range fields relevant to the extant socio-political international scene in the modern era.

Born on June 1, 1933 to a well-known Bengali family (his father was a direct descendent of Quazi-ul Quzzat a.k.a. Quazi Nooruddin who was the last Mughal Chief Justice of Bengal in the 1800s before the Mughal Empire in India was taken over by Great Britain and his mother was the grand daughter of the "Kumar Bahadur" or Prince of Salar who in turn was a descendent of "Raja" or Grand Prince Enayetullah -- the "Nayeb" or Prime Minister to Queen Bhavani of Bengal) in Calcutta, the former British capital of India and the current capital of the West Bengal state of India, General Dastgir studied in St.  Xavier's College in Calcutta and subsequently graduated from the University of Peshawar in present day Pakistan.   His family migrated to Pakistan in 1950 and settled in Dhaka, then the capital of East Pakistan and currently the capital of Bangladesh.

As a child he had always wanted to be a soldier and in 1950 he became the only Bengali in entire Pakistan to be selected for the 4th Pre Cadet Training School in Quetta, Pakistan and successfully completed the 6 months rigorous training, then a pre-requisite for selection to join the Pakistan Military Academy.  He joined the Pakistan Military Academy in February, 1951 as part of the 7th Batch of Long Course and was commissioned in the elite First Battalion of the famous East Bengal Regiment as a permanent regular officer in the Pakistan Army in February 14, 1953 after standing fifth (only one Bengali in the history of the Pakistan Military Academy had ranked higher) in the 7th PMA (Pakistan Military Academy) graduating class of 74 gentlemen cadets.  He later graduated from the prestigious Command and Staff College at Quetta, Pakistan; School of Infantry and Tactics at Fort Benning in Georgia, USA; and Special Warfare School at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, USA.  As a Second Lieutenant he was a Platoon Commander and was decorated with a Commonwealth medal in 1956, while as a Captain he held the coveted post of General Staff Officer 3 (G-3) and was selected for infantry training in the United States after excelling in a highly competitive selection process after a personal interview by General Yahya Khan who later on became Commander-in Chief of the Pakistan Army.   His brilliant performance during the U.S. infantry training, which took place in the midst of the Bay of Pigs episode in U.S.  history, earned him an offer to be an instructor in the U.S.  army but a nationalist at heart, he opted to return to his native country.  In the U.S.  he studied, among other topics, heli-borne infantry tactics, counter-insurgency, guerrilla warfare and military law.  He also became a qualified rappler during this time.  In the early 1960s, he was selected to command the army contingent of guards during the State Visit of Queen Elizabeth II and her consort Prince Phillip to Dhaka.  An avid athelete, he also served as a judge in the diving competitions at the Commonwealth Games in Pakistan during the early 1960s.

Decorated in the 1965 Indo-Pakistan War, he was honored with the granting of a six-month antedate seniority making his official commissioning date September, 1952 and served as a Brigade Major from 1965-67.  With his postings in Bannu, which is opposite Quetta and Jalalabad, he came in contact with a lot of people of tribal tradition and culture, indigenous to the people of Afghanistan as well as Pakistan.  

In 1969 he became the first among his military course mates to reach the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, initially commanding the First East Bengal Regiment (the battalion he had been commissioned in), and then serving in the most coveted position of his rank as the General Staff Officer Grade 1 of an independent army division (the 7th Division of the Pakistan Army) in Quetta, Pakistan which bordered Kandahar province from 1970-71.   In this position he was solely responsible for the operational planning of the division.

He was promoted to the rank of full Colonel in 1973 when he was appointed the first Chief of Logistics (the combined posts of Quartermaster General and Master General of Ordinance) at the Bangladesh Army Headquarters.

In 1974 he was given charge of the northern army area of Bangladesh as Commander of the independent 72 Infantry Brigade (later upgraded to the 66th Infantry Division) stationed in Rangpur.  Among other accomplishments, he did the site selection for the Army’s Cantonment in the city of Bogra which currently houses the headquarters of the 11th Infantry Division of the Bangladesh Army.  Decorated with the army’s Independence and Victory medals at this time, his successes in Rangpur rapidly earned him the attention of the President of Bangladesh as well as the military hierarchy, and in June, 1974 he was appointed Commander of the independent 65th Infantry Brigade (later upgraded to the 24th Infantry Division), the largest Bangladesh army formation in charge of the main port area of Chittagong, the insurgency infested district of Chittagong Hill Tracts and surrounding areas which bordered the nations of Burma, India and the Bay of Bengal.  He was also appointed ex officio Commandant of the East Bengal Regimental Centre while commanding the Chittagong area.  At the personal request of the founding father (and President) of Bangladesh, General Dastgir took over counter-insurgency operations in his command area and led Bangladesh’s first successful combined army, navy, air force military operation called “Operation Dragon Drive” (which later formed the basis of a major BBC study on counter-insurgency and civil-military relations during the 1990s) in the Chittagong Hill Tracts region against “Shorbohara” separatist insurgents in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in the 1970s.  He was promoted to the rank of Brigadier in 1975 and decorated with the Jatiyo Nirapatya Padak, the highest operational military medal in Bangladesh.  

Being the leading military figure in the region, General Dastgir had long realized the importance of civilian support for the success of military operations, and he distinguished himself for his respect of civilian rule and adept understanding of the proper role of the army in civil-military relations – he is still fondly remembered by the local people of the region for adhering to a public request by lifting an army imposed curfew to allow all walks of life to participate in a popular gathering to honor a regional religious figure.

In August, 1975 he was the first among his military academy course-mates (both in Pakistan and Bangladesh) and contemporaries to be promoted to the rank of Major General – the highest rank in the Bangladesh Army at that time – and thus became the first Bangladesh Army formation commander to hold claim to the title “General Officer Commanding”.  In November, 1975 he was appointed Director General of the Bangladesh Rifles (Chief of Border Force) which he commanded till December 12, 1977.  At the same time he served as the Zonal Martial Law Administrator (ZMLA) -- the military governor -- of Dhaka Division.   During this time he led the Bangladesh delegation for highly successful border talks with India held in Calcutta in 1975 and New Delhi in 1976, both of which formed the basis of Indo-Bangladesh border relations for the next three decades.  As the senior-most army general in a transitional military government, ZMLA General Dastgir was out-ranked only by the President of Bangladesh and was entrusted with several key public administration and economic management responsibilities, and undertook major policy reforms such as the “Dastgir Tea Commission” recommendations which studied important aspects and overhauled the Bangladesh tea industry, reinstating tea as the nation’s major export and foreign exchange earner.   General Dastgir’s successful counter-offensive against Indian incursions in the Mymensingh border of Bangladesh earned him his second Jatiyo Nirapatya Padak.

In December, 1977 General Dastgir joined the Bangladesh Ministry of Foreign Affairs with the rank and status of a Secretary to the Government.  In May, 1978 he was appointed Ambassador of Bangladesh to Thailand with concurrent accreditation to the Philippines and served until June, 1982.  General Dastgir’s diplomatic skills and close ties with King Bhumibol Aduliyadej, then Prime Ministers General Kriangsak Chomanand and General Prem Tinsulananda of Thailand as well as President Ferdinand Marcos and Foreign Minister General Carlos Romulo of the Philippines were instrumental in the election of the Bangladesh Foreign Secretary as the head (Executive Secretary) of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) in 1981.  It was at this time he became personal friends with then U.S.  Ambassador to Thailand Morton Abramowitz (currently with the International Rescue Committee and a leading U.S.  think tank in Washington, DC, U.S.A.).  

During this time he was also appointed the Bangladesh Permanent Representative to the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) from 1979 to 1982, and acquired a thorough understanding of the various socio-economic issues facing Asian countries.  

While Ambassador to Thailand, General Dastgir wrote an affectionate tribute to the brave soldiers in his command who defended the territorial integrity of Bangladesh during the 1970s.  All leading newspapers in Bangladesh published the piece, entitled “The Dauntless BDR Sipahee”.

General Dastgir was Bangladesh Ambassador to Pakistan from June, 1982 to December, 1983 during the Soviet occupation of bordering Afghanistan and U.S. supported counter-attacks sponsored by Pakistan.  His close ties with the Pakistani military hierarchy, especially his personal friendship with then Pakistan’s President General Zia-ul Huq and then Foreign Minister (later U.N.  Special Envoy) General Sahabzada Yaqub Khan, bolstered Pakistan’s bilateral relations with Bangladesh and went a long way in healing the bitterness of the civil war fought by the two South Asian nations in 1971.  During his tenure in Pakistan, General Dastgir visited his various areas of service while in the Pakistan army during the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s, touring the Afghanistan border and noting new initiatives taken in guerrilla warfare, counter-insurgency tactics, and civil-military relations.   In March 26, 1983, General Dastgir in his capacity as Ambassador of Bangladesh gave a nationally televised speech aired by Pakistan Television (PTV) to the Pakistani people, addressing various foreign policy and bilateral issues between Bangladesh and Pakistan.  The speech underscored the agenda which governed relations between the two countries for the next couple of decades, and was a milestone event in the normalization of relations between the two nations which had been arch foes only a decade earlier.

He served as High Commissioner for Bangladesh to Australia with concurrent accreditation to New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and Fiji from January, 1984 to January, 1988.  During this period, he attended the Commonwealth Heads of Government Regional Meeting in Papua New Guinea in 1984 as member of Bangladesh delegation. He was leader of Bangladesh delegation to the Tenth Asian and Pacific Labour Ministers Conference held in Melbourne in October, 1985.  General Dastgir led the Bangladesh delegation to the 44th International Cotton Advisory Committee meeting held in Sydney from 28th October to 1st November, 1985.  During this time he formed close ties and personal friendship with the Australian Viceroy, Governor General Sir Ninian Stephen, as well as then Prime Minister Bob Hawke and then Foreign Minister (later Prime Minister) John Howard.  General Dastgir’s diplomatic skills garnered en bloc support from Australia and neighboring Pacific Ocean countries for the candidature and eventual election of the Bangladesh Foreign Minister to the post President of the UN General Assembly.  General Dastgir became acquainted with Pope John Paul II during this time.

He was the Ambassador of Bangladesh to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from February, 1988 to August, 1991 with concurrent accreditation to Jordan, Yemen, Niger, and Somalia.  During his tenure to Saudi Arabia, the Gulf War took place and General Dastgir was instrumental in sending a Bangladesh contingent of troops, consisting of his very own infantry battalion the First East Bengal Regiment (which he had commanded in the late 1960s), as part of Operation Desert Storm.  General Dastgir’s initiative in this front was Bangladesh’s first participation in an international military coalition, which in turn paved the way for future roles for the Bangladesh Armed Forces in United Nations Peacekeeping Operations in various world theaters. 

As the Ambassador of Bangladesh to Saudi Arabia, General Dastgir also served as the Permanent Representative of Bangladesh to the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC), the Islamic Development Bank (IDB), and the Saudi Fund for Development.   By virtue of this, General Dastgir acquired extensive knowledge of various wide ranging policy reforms and economic management issues extant in OIC / IDB member countries from the regions of North Africa, the Middle East and West Asia, South Asia, and South-East Asia – ranging from governments in transition changing from absolute monarchies to constitutional ones, theocracies transforming to secular nations, autocracies and military regimes converting to democracies, and socialistic economies attempting to embrace capitalism.

General Dastgir’s diplomatic skills and personal relations with (then) Saudi King Fahd, then Saudi Crown Prince (and current King) Abdullah, Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al Faisal, and (then) Saudi Defense Minister (and current Crown Prince) Prince Sultan as well as (then) Jordan’s King Hussein and (then) Crown Prince Hassan, were instrumental in Arab support for the election of the Bangladesh Foreign Secretary as the Deputy Secretary General of the OIC in 1991.  

During the Gulf War, General Dastgir was interviewed by the Voice of America for a world-wide broadcast in which he spoke about a range of issues including regional security, the military as well as socio-political impact of the conflict within the framework of Muslim nations as well as the general international diplomatic scene, and the resulting polarizations among Asian nations.

For his distinguished services as the Ambassador of Bangladesh to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, General Dastgir was decorated in 1991 with the King Abdul Aziz Order Class 1 by (then) King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, making him the only Asian envoy to receive the prestigious award.  Other recipients of this Saudi Arabian equivalent of a British knighthood included then U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (and later Secretary of State) General Colin Powell and then Commander of the U.S.  Central Command General Norman Schwarzkopf, with whom General Dastgir got acquainted in Saudi Arabia. 

After completing his tenure in diplomatic service, General Dastgir returned to Bangladesh and from 1991 to 1999 served as the Chairman of Interpreter, a leading Bangladeshi private sector firm which marketed multinational IT products from the Singapore based Datamini corporation and dairy products from the Australian brand company Ballantyne.

In 1996 he was exclusively interviewed by CNN’s South Asian Anchor Ms.  Anita Pratap for a world-wide broadcast in which he discussed his views on the extant political situation, including issues related to Bangladesh’s world pioneering experiment with a “transitional, non-political government” wielding power during national elections to ensure neutrality following a milestone constitutional amendment earlier that year.

In 1997, he was elected Chairman of the Retired Armed Forces Officers Welfare Association (RAOWA) – Bangladesh’s only veteran’s association for army, navy and air force officers -- and served a two-year term.  From 1996 till 2003, he was the chief foreign policy adviser to former President of Bangladesh H. M.  Ershad and attended international conferences in North Africa as a personal representative of the former President.

Elected to the Royal Commonwealth Society in 1998, Ambassador General Dastgir has served as its Presidium Member and Vice President until 2005.  

He is also an active member of Bangladesh’s American Alumni Association (AAA), an institutionalized gathering of U.S. alumni (i.e., graduates of U.S. Institutions) living in Bangladesh.  This U.S.  Embassy-sponsored organization aims to promote U.S. academic programs and is chaired by the U.S. Ambassador to Bangladesh.

Multilingual with fluency in most major South Asian languages, including Bengali, Hindi, Urdu and English and a working knowledge of Arabic and Punjabi, General Dastgir is an international standard "bridge" player, having won several major tournaments along with international “master points”.  The Bangladesh High Commissioner's Cup Bridge Tournament at the Southern Cross Club in Woden, Canberra, Australia was started by General Dastgir.

On February 5, 1965, then Major Dastgir married Kohinoor Rasheed Choudhury of Sylhet -- the wedding reception was held on April 26, 1965.  Mrs.  Dastgir is the daughter of Abdur Rasheed Choudhury (a direct descendent of a Pathan governor of Sylhet) who served as a member of the central legislative assembly as well as the Viceroy's advisory council in Unified India during the 1940s and famously declined a British knighthood, and Begum Sirajunnessa Choudhury (a member of the royal family of Ita in Sylhet and a direct descendent of King Subid Narayan of Ita) who served as Member of the National Assembly in Pakistan during the 1960s.  Mrs.  Dastgir is also the younger sister of Ambassador Humayun Rasheed Choudhury who, as Foreign Minister of Bangladesh, served as President of the 41st United Nations General Assembly before going on to become Speaker of the Bangladesh Parliament.

Mrs.  Dastgir is an internationally known social worker in her own right and is a recipient of the International Red Cross Gold Medal.  She has served as the founder president of many social organizations, including RAWA and Shejuti dedicated to the socio-economic welfare of Bangladesh Rifles troops and RAOWA Ladies as well as RAFOLA -- designated for the welfare of the families of retired armed forces officers in Bangladesh.  Excerpts from Mrs.  Dastgir's personal diaries while in Saudi Arabia as the wife of the Ambassador of Bangladesh during the first Gulf War were published in the early 1990s under the heading "Witness to History" by the leading English daily in Bangladesh at the behest of renowned international journalist and Editor S. M. Ali, a personal friend.

As of 2008, General and Mrs.  Dastgir resided in Dhaka, Bangladesh and together they have a son and a daughter.  Their son Mr.  Quazi Rumman Dastgir is a former World Bank staff who served as the Agency Fiscal Officer for the Department of Transportation at the Government of the District of Columbia, U.S.A..  Their daughter Ms.  Ayesha Dastgir is a former UNICEF staff who served with OXFAM.
Ambassador Major General Quazi Golam Dastgir, KAAO, psc
Key Appointments

A. Government Service

i. Bangladesh Foreign Service

1988-91
Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Rank: Secretary to the Government of Bangladesh
Post: Ambassador of Bangladesh to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with concurrent accreditation to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Niger, Somalia and Yemen

And

Permanent Representative to the Organization of  Islamic Conference (OIC), the Islamic Development Bank (IDB), and the Saudi Fund for Development

1984-88
Title: High Commissioner Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Rank: Secretary to the Government of Bangladesh
Post: High Commissioner for Bangladesh to Australia with concurrent accreditation to New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Fiji

1982-84
Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Rank: Secretary to the Government of Bangladesh
Post: Ambassador of Bangladesh to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan

1978-82
Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Rank: Secretary to the Government of Bangladesh
Post: Ambassador of Bangladesh to the Kingdom of  Thailand with concurrent accreditation to the Philippines

And

Permanent Representative to the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) from 1979 to 1982

ii. Bangladesh Army

1975-77
Rank: Major General
Post(s): Director General of Bangladesh Rifles (BDR) <<Chief of the Border Forces>>

And

Zonal Martial Law Administrator (ZMLA) of Dhaka Division
Location: BDR Headquarters, Dhaka, Bangladesh

1975
Rank: Major General
Post(s): Commander, 65 (independent) Infantry Brigade

And

Commandant, the East Bengal Regimental Centre (EBRC)
Location: Chittagong Cantonment, Bangladesh

1975
Rank: Brigadier
Post(s): Commander, 65 (independent) Infantry Brigade

And

Commandant, the East Bengal Regimental Centre (EBRC)
Location: Chittagong Cantonment, Bangladesh

1974-75
Rank: Colonel
Post(s): Commander, 65 (independent) Infantry Brigade

And

Commandant, the East Bengal Regimental Centre (EBRC)
Location: Chittagong Cantonment, Bangladesh

1974
Rank: Colonel
Post: Commander, 72 (independent) Infantry Brigade
Location: Rangpur Cantonment, Bangladesh

1973-74
Rank: Colonel
Post: Chief of Logistics
Location: Army Headquarters, Dhaka, Bangladesh

iii. Pakistan Army

1971-72
Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Post: General Staff Officer (GSO) 1 – Coord at General Headquarters (GHQ)
Location: Rawalpindi, West Pakistan

1971 Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Post: General Staff Officer (GSO) 1 at Corps Headquarters
Location: Lahore, Punjab, West Pakistan

1970-71 Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Post: General Staff Officer (GSO) 1, Divisional Headquarters of 16th (independent) Division
Location: Quetta (bordering Kandahar Province of Afghanistan), Beluchistan, West Pakistan

1969-70 Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Post: Commanding Officer (CO), First East Bengal Regiment
Location: Jessore, East Pakistan

1965-69 Rank: Major
Post(s): Brigade Major, Company Commander, Battalion 2 IC (2nd-in-Command)
Location: Bannu, opposite Quetta and Jalalabad, in West Pakistan, Hyderabad, Sindh in West Pakistan, and Jessore in East Pakistan

1965 Rank: Major
Post: Staff College
Location: Quetta (bordering Kandahar Province of Afghanistan), Beluchistan, West Pakistan

1957-65 Rank:  Captain / Major
Post(s) Quartermaster, Adjutant, Company Commander
Location: Comilla in East Pakistan, and Lahore and Abottabad in West Pakistan

1953-56 Rank: Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant
Post(s): Company Commander, G-3 Location: Jessore, East Pakistan

1951-53 Rank: Gentleman Cadet
Post(s): Not Applicable
Location: Pakistan Military Academy, Kakul, West Pakistan

B. International  and Regional Cooperation

2003-2005
Position: Presidium Member and Vice President
Organization: Royal Commonwealth Society

1998–2003
Position: Member
Organization: Royal Commonwealth Society

C. Social Sector

1997-98
Position: Chairman
Organization: Retired Armed Forces Officers Welfare Association (RAOWA)
Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh
Major Work: Chief executive of social organization for the welfare of retired army, navy, and air force officers – Bangladesh’s only veterans’ association

D. Political  Sector

1996-2003
Position: Chief foreign policy adviser to former President of Bangladesh H. M.  Ershad
Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh

E. Academic / Education Sector

1996–present
Position: Member
Organization: American Alumni Association (AAA)
Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh
Details: An institutionalized gathering of U.S. alumni (i.e., graduates of .S. Institutions) living in Bangladesh.  This U.S.  Embassy - sponsored organization aims to promote U.S. academic programs and is chaired by the U.S. Ambassador to Bangladesh.

F. Corporate / Private Sector

1997–present
Position: Shareholder
Firm: Square Pharmaceuticals
Location: Headquartered in Dhaka, Bangladesh with international business dealings
Business: Producer and sales of major pharmaceutical products

General Information

1. Contact Details:

House 36 (New), Road 11 (New),
Dhanmandi R/A,
Dhaka,
Bangladesh

Telephone: +880-2-8113535
Cell Phone: +880-171-52-6478
E-Mail: dastgir@bdmail.net

2.  Date of Birth and Nationality:

Date of Birth: June 1, 1933
Place of Birth: Calcutta, West Bengal, India
Current Nationality: Bangladesh
Past Nationalities: Pakistani and (British) Indian

3. Education:

A. Academic:

1964 Bachelor of Arts
Pass course with political science as major course of study
University of Peshawar, Pakistan

1950  Intermediate School Certificate
St.  Xavier’s College, Calcutta, West Bengal, India

1948 Matriculation Certificate
Park Circus High School, Calcutta, West Bengal, India

B. Military:

1965 Graduated from the Command  and Staff College, Quetta, Beluchistan,
Pakistan

1963 Graduated from the Special Warfare School, Fort Bragg, North Carolina,
U.S.A.

1963 Graduated from the School of Infantry and Tactics, Fort Benning, Georgia, U.S.A.

1953 (ante dated seniority 1952) Commissioned as Permanent Regular Officer in the Pakistan Army after graduating fifth of his class from the Pakistan
Military Academy (PMA), 7th Batch Long Course, Kakul, Pakistan

4. Language Fluency:

Bengali, English and Urdu – reading, writing and spoken
Hindi and Punjabi – spoken only
Arabic – reading only

5. Publication:

“The Dauntless BDR Sipahee” --  an affectionate tribute to the brave soldiers in his
command who defended the territorial integrity of Bangladesh during the 1970s.  The piece,
written in 1980, was published by all leading news papers in Bangladesh as part of the
Bangladesh Rifles (BDR) reunion retrospective.

6. Radio / Television Appearances:

1996
Cable News Network (CNN) -- exclusively interviewed by CNN’s South Asian Anchor Ms. Anita Pratap for a worldwide television broadcast in which General Dastgir discussed his views on the extant political situation, including issues related to Bangladesh’s world pioneering experiment with a “transitional, non-political government” wielding power during national elections to ensure neutrality following a milestone constitutional amendment earlier that year.

1995
Bangladesh Television (BTV) – exclusively interviewed by BTV on the commemoration of the anniversary of the founding of the Bangladesh Rifles (BDR).

1991
Voice of America (VOA) – radio interview for worldwide broadcast on multifarious issues on the Gulf War.   Issues discussed included a wide range of topics including regional security, the military as well as socio-political impact of the conflict within the framework of Muslim nations as well as the general international diplomatic scene, and the resulting polarizations among Asian nations.

1983
Pakistan Television (PTV) – nationally televised address to mark the Independence Day of Bangladesh

7. International Conferences / Seminars:

2001
Lead speaker at international seminar on border relations and tensions with India, organized by the Bangladesh Institute of International Studies (BIIS),  a leading South Asian think tank.

1997
Attended international conference in North Africa as personal representative of former President of Bangladesh H. M.  Ershad

1996
Attended international conference in North Africa as personal representative of former President of Bangladesh H. M. Ershad

1988-91
Permanent Representative of Bangladesh to various meetings of the Organization of Islamic States (OIC), the Islamic Development Bank (IDB), and the Saudi Fund for Development held in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

1985
Leader of Bangladesh delegation to the Tenth Asian and Pacific Labour Ministers
Conference held in Melbourne in October, 1985. 

Led the Bangladesh delegation to the 44th International Cotton Advisory Committee
meeting held in Sydney from 28th October to 1st November, 1985.

1984
Attended the Commonwealth Heads of Government Regional Meeting in Papua New
Guinea in 1984 as member of Bangladesh delegation.

1979-82
Permanent Representative of Bangladesh to various meetings of United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) held in Bangkok, Thailand and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) held in Manila, the Philippines

1976
Leader of the Bangladesh delegation for border talks with India held in New Delhi, India.

1975
Leader of the Bangladesh delegation for border talks with India held in Calcutta, West Bengal, India
Witness to History:  1930s to 2000s
Family Pictures 1930s to 1960s
The General
The Ambassador
The Statesman
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